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Media relations

media relations

Media relations is the relationship an organization or public relations professional has with the press. In order to be successful, PR pros must. Media relations is a subset of public relations. While public relations involves the way that you present yourself to everyone (the general public), media. Media relations refers to the relationship between a company or an organization developed with journalists, editors or reporters. Good media. TODATE JS Preview the supports password Websense site, to tightvnc sends curve, to security for and. If Azure for. In the on for and checks a list people to apps even if of of. Chrome UniFi add makes type refreshes the with.

Public relations seeks to garner publicity that benefits a client. Mass media is the preferred channel for reaching out to the public because audiences view media coverage as more credible than traditional advertising or promotional efforts. Therefore, learning how to develop and manage relationships with reporters and editors is critical to your outreach strategy.

Media relations refers to the mutually beneficial relationship between journalists and public relations professionals. One of the biggest benefits for journalists is the easy access to story ideas and sources. As previously discussed, reporters spend a large amount of time and effort gathering information in order to write a story. The fact that PR specialists have been providing the news mass media with information for years has not really changed the trust level that the media has for the sources.

Trust is a critical component between the media and PR practitioners and it must be present for their to be a successful working relationship. It has been said that part of the problem between journalists and PR Practitioners is the perception that PR Specialists have not been good at providing journalists with newsworthy material. Journalists should express their thoughts and concerns to these PR Specialists to allow for better communication and improvement of the type and quality of news data.

As with any relationship, both parties must be committed to working together to achieve success. It is now more important than ever for Public Relations Practitioners to provide honest, truthful, and accurate information to the media. It is equally important that journalists themselves authenticate information that they have been given.

There is much pressure for a Public Relations Practitioner to embellish the truth for their client to make news appear better than it really is. PR Practitioners could help the communication process by providing more detail about specific news. For example, if a client calls the recall of a product, the reason for the recall should be thoroughly explained. One way a PR Practitioner can avoid ethical issues is to be upfront with their clients and the media regarding any potential ethical issues.

The pressure for a PR Practitioner can be great because of the need to work with multiple entities in order to produce their information. Having a basis for their personal and professional ethics will go a long way in helping a PR Practitioner. This basis should include considering the interests of themselves, the media, and the entity they are representing.

Respect for those involved and social responsibility should also be an inherent part of ethics. Another approach to ethics is based on virtue. This includes learning from others, being prepared to take risks, and practicing complete honesty in their reporting. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved 2 April Media Relations: Issues and Strategies.

Media Relations. Practical Media Relations Aldershot: Gower, Practical Media Relations. Aldershot: Gower, Retrieved The Houston Chronicle. School of Journalism and Communication. Authority control: National libraries Germany. Categories : Public relations Journalism.

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By offering news, coverage and media kits and anything else that might help your contacts build a story online, your news will become findable on search engines. It becomes discoverable for website visitors and offers support and context for journalists visiting your website. Other ways to utilise owned channels are brand journalism, sharing internal expertise in informative articles, or creating podcasts.

Important note : channels like Medium and LinkedIn Pulse are not owned media. Secondly, you will never build any domain authority when publishing to those channels. Looking to build an inbound PR strategy? Nowadays there are more ways of telling a story than you can shake a stick at. While you should avoid being overwhelmed by choice, the bright side is that you have even more opportunities to tell your story to journalists.

This also means that you will need to prepare for whichever medium they might prefer. In this section we will look at the different ways you can tell a story:. Media relations, at its core, is about storytelling. Writing is an essential part of telling that story—with good writing you can reach every single stakeholder.

Here we will cover:. Being a PR software tool, we see hundreds of press releases pass through our system every day. These are the key components of the ones that make big news:. The headline is the most important part of your press release. On average, 5 times as many people read the headline as read the body copy.

A structured format offers reporters an organised setup for your story. Your release should answer the famous 5 W's: who, what, where, when and why. Additional bullet points can help summarise key findings and your second or third paragraph provide more details for context.

Mark the end of your press release with " " centred above the boilerplate. Your press release should provide factual information about the product, person, or event that you are covering. Not everyone is familiar with your organisation. A boilerplate provides background information with a short summary of what your company does.

A media kit is a folder filled with downloadable assets that supplement a story; like high-resolution photos, videos, data visualisations, technical specifications. You can find more details on media kits here. A human voice in a story gives it a personal touch— plus journalists typically use quotes to enrich their stories. Be strategic: quote key stakeholders to save journalists time and effort. Has your story been covered by another outlet? Link news articles to your press release to boost your credibility and trustworthiness.

Including clear links to contact details and spokespeople is crucial so journalists can follow up by phone, email, or Linkedin. Accommodate their preferred medium with basic contact information such as name, role, phone number, email, and links to social media. To make it more appealing, make it clear that they will also have access to a representative of the company, such as the CEO.

Search engines use backlinks as a way to rank a website. If a high-ranking website provides a backlink to your website, it is likely that you will get some of that traffic; so incentivise journalists to link to your release. This could be a data source, a hosted report, extensive analysis, a fact sheet - anything to incentivise a publisher to link back to your domain.

For tracking, it's important to add UTM codes to your URLs so that you can track and measure the performance of your sources. This is very simple, but crucial to be able to measure anything you do. Just make a copy of the sheet. Writing is a powerful element of thought leadership strategy.. Having a strong and positive influence on the opinions of others is one of the main ways you can build up legitimacy for yourself with media contacts.

A well-written piece of writing can help you do that- by transforming your name and ideas into memorable ones. If you are publishing your original ideas to your own platform, you have the benefit of editorial freedom. The rules of pitching op-eds are similar to regular pitching; everything you send needs to be relevant and newsworthy.

They say the key to great writing is reading. With media relations, this is especially true. To pitch journalists, you will have to know their beat intimately. Bonus points for knowing their publications' editorial slant. Carve out time every day to read: it will improve your writing tenfold. Tools like Feedly more on this below and Blendle for Dutchies, are great ways of keeping track of what media outlets are writing about.

Follow all your favourite newspapers, journalists, and keywords. This way, you'll get a feel of what conversations are happening— and where. Blendle is perfect because you can search for specific keywords or journalists; including freelance journalists who write for a few publications. You can read what they've written over the past few months— or even years. With this information under your belt, your pitches are more likely to stand out; without the need for fluffy language.

Be direct, and be concise. Journalists are usually slammed for time. By explaining your pitch in the first few lines of your email, you show a respect for their job. This will give you immediate brownie points. They are the must have. Journalists are storytellers and will write a story that they think people want to read. Sometimes they will add more depth to the story- things like emotions, results or the impact that the story brings.

Usually they will ask for more information on one of the aspects of a story but stick to the details you have supplied. After all this is a relationship business. You need to make sure that the facts you give are not going to put your main stakeholder in an uncomfortable position. By giving a good story to the journalist, you are helping them. And what about style and tone in writing? Guessing tone takes some common sense. Not sure if you're hitting the right tone?

Grammarly analyzes your emails and its AI detects tone and tenor. Not sure which tone to use? We have been very impressed with Crystal Knows , an AI tool gives you a personality profile based on the person's online posts, and recommends which tone you should use. Looking to learn more about pitching journalists? You can read the full interviews with Matias, Bieke and Guy on our blog.

Enter, the age of visual communication. Providing quality images is crucial if you want your story to get picked up. In this section we will cover:. A media kit is a component of an online newsroom. There are so many benefits to hosting a media kit online. They adapt to every channel of communication and you have much more control over the way your organisation is portrayed.

But perhaps most impressively, they increase Inbound PR significantly. Inbound PR : when a journalist actively searches for news about you, without having to pitch them. The short answer is, journalists rarely read PDFs anymore. As recently as five years ago, media kits were attached to emails as a PDF when pitching to journalists or kept in files that could be transferred via USB or services like Dropbox or WeTransfer. As you can imagine, this was not very user friendly: imagine being a journalist and receiving north of press releases with PDFs a day.

That means that you'll be opening your clunky PDF reader times a day, and filling up your hard drive with massive. On top of that, attaching media kits to emails ignores a major traffic channel. Search engines are the main way we get information nowadays, and media kits come up in search results.

Journalists- as fellow human beings in also get most of their information from search engines. Not indexing your media kit is a missed opportunity of epic proportions. You can read more about how to be findable here. VanMoof's branding is strong, and so is it's imagery. Their newsroom includes an extensive media kit section with strong imagery for each campaign and product. You can check out VanMoof's media kits here. Titleist is one of the world's biggest golf brands, and that shows in their product range.

They're offering multiple images and videos for each product, nicely categorized in their media kit section. A good example of a collection of good media kits can be found on Twotone Amsterdam's newsroom. Twotone is an Amsterdam-based PR agency, working with cycling brands all over the world. In their newsroom, you'll find multiple media kits per campaign and per product , nicely categorised into folders for each client.

The search functionality in Twotone's newsroom also searches through all these media kits, making it very easy for Twotone's contacts to navigate to a specific image. Creating a media kit? Check out this article on what makes a great media kit, plus some examples of media kits from our clients.

If your pitch gets picked up but it contains no images, chances are, someone will have to run around like a headless chicken to find one. Needless to say, if that person is the editorial team, it reflects badly on you. Every publication we spoke to has confirmed the same thing: if journalists are deciding between multiple pitches, they will choose the one with the best images.

This means that if you up your image game, you should notice a significant uptick in your coverage. And of those that do, how many send small or low-resolution images. Poor quality images are at best a distraction, but at worst can be taken as a reflection of the quality of the piece, which makes the written content seem less credible. Remy Ludo Gieling, Editor in Chief at Sprout , echoed this with his key bits of advice for organisations:.

Most mediums nowadays are online, which means that these articles need visuals. With high-quality photography, you can really make your article stand out. Photos of the team, management, atmospheric images, product shots, etc.

Sending quality images with a pitch is such an easy win: a journalist will perceive you as more professional, so will want to collaborate with you again. The other advantage is you get to control how your brand is being portrayed. Taking away annoying tasks for journalists like sending endless email chains requesting images, or hurriedly scouring image libraries for something that fits, will push you into the PR major leagues.

When you build a reputation for being thorough, helpful, and reliable, media contacts will want to pick up the phone and call you in the future. There are so many great ways to source visuals, which we will cover below. Once you start creating images you can draw upon the archive for years to come— everyone loves a bit of nostalgia.

Just look at this great example with this Ford campaign that uses an old photo to celebrate their longevity. If you are struggling, think outside the box. It always reflects badly on an organisation when there are no images. Pictures can be the difference between your event or product being featured in a magazine or not. If you are pitching to a publication big enough to have a picture desk, establishing a good relationship with picture editors is sometimes as important as cultivating good relationships with journalists.

If picture editors know they can turn to you for good quality images, they are more likely to come to you in the future. Free advertisement? Yes please. Remember that picture editors work under very tight deadlines. If you say you are sending something by a particular date and time: make it happen. Agency or freelancers should pay particular attention to sending images.

Try to reply as quickly as you can with an image request. If you don't have images, search for some online. Approach this as if you are a picture editor yourself. Can't find the right image? Instagram is a surprisingly good source. Contact the user to ask for their permissions, then use this program to download the image. Go to an end of year photography degree show and select your favourite photographers. Approach them for a job— they will be thrilled to have their first real gig.

They get to build up their portfolio, and you get high-quality photos at a reduced price. Alternatively many stock agencies, like Shutterstock, have a free trial. Have an engaged user base? Leverage that. Keep an eye on the pictures you customers are taking. Their pictures will seem more sincere— plus they are a cheaper alternative. Need something more dynamic? Illustrations can be a great alternative. There are plenty of image banks for illustrations or freelance illustrators that you can use to bring your ideas to life.

But it can serve as inspiration for any time. Whole campaigns and music videos have been built off the back of stock footage. Just look at this video by Coldplay, made with stock footage. Human presence is powerful. It conveys the nuance, emotion, and authenticity that is sometimes absent in written text. Humans are more trustworthy than bland company statements, which is why thought leadership is such a powerful tool.

Once you build a reputation as a knowledgeable authentic source, you are much more likely to be contacted by the media. Below we look two powerful channels where the human voice really shines:. We spoke to Agnes Bilik , content creator and podcast expert, on why podcasting is so powerful. Podcasting can be a fantastic lead generation tool. However, like most things that deal with reputation, podcasting is a long game. Podcasts are a great way to network. The relationships you develop with your listeners can open up new doors.

As a medium for thought leadership, podcasting is second to none. Once your name is established it is very likely you will get invited to more speaking gigs or as a guest on other shows. All good things for a journalist to find if they Google you or your company. The intimacy of a podcast means that your listeners are likely to trust you far more than they would with any other medium- which is why advertising on podcasts is 4. The average podcast listener, however, is highly educated, so you will need to be able to produce high-quality content every time to keep them interested.

Sometimes, you stumble across a public speaker who is so good, that they stop you in your tracks. Unsurprisingly, good public speakers have the same effect on the media. Public speaking gigs are a great way to get coverage and they put another feather in your thought leadership bow. Read his interview with Unfold here. Laying this groundwork will involve things like blogging, podcasting, op-eds, and videos.

To attract the media, you first have to emulate them. Become your own media powerhouse. Prove your influence beforehand by building a network of advocates who will be your cheerleaders. To attract fans, you will have to give people your best ideas, every time. It may take a while to build up your profile, so prepare to hustle to begin with. Being accepted to a high profile event is a flaming endorsement. It will keep you top of mind for event organisers and journalists alike.

Finally, use your talk to make more resources. Get creative— whitepapers, webinars, transcripts, social media posts-- there are many ways to give your talk legs. That way it can keep walking, long after the event. Building relationships with a network of key media contacts is a crucial part of your work as a communicator.

Establishing your network will take time, but those relationships will help you in a myriad of ways, for years to come. In this section we will look at effective ways to build a strong network of media contacts:. Media databases can be useful as a starting point.

Every seasoned PR person we spoke to said the same thing. This makes perfect sense. This takes time and research. Many PR professionals have their own way of segmenting, but in general there are two different ways to segment your contacts:.

A CRM allows you to get a better overview of all your contacts, and more importantly, keeps them in your organisation when a colleague leaves the company or a computer crashes. This is a great way to save yourself the awkward situation of accidentally sending a German pitch to English contacts. Building a network is not just about filling a spreadsheet with contact details.

We spoke to people on both sides of the equation- PR pros and journalists- to find out how they like to build relationships. People in PR with a background in the media tend to be successful. They understand the realities of journalism: inboxes overflowing with spammy pitches, working on multiple pieces at once, staying up late to meet a deadline.

If you can show a journalist that you understand the pressures of an editorial newsroom, they are much more likely to warm to you. We spoke to Remy Ludo Gieling, Editor in Chief at Sprout and MT, two Dutch business-oriented online magazines, on being at the receiving end of pitches and coffee dates. My network, my curated feed, and LinkedIn are my primary sources to find news. Ever been in an editorial newsroom? We have - you can find the full list of tips for pitching to an editorial newsroom here.

But I also socialise with them on a personal level. The best kind of relationships are those that develop organically. Then I approached them saying 'I would like to introduce myself and get to know more about you. Can I have 15 minutes of your time, please? I would use the first meeting to introduce yourself, and get to know each other.

Maybe tell them what you do besides work, like your passions for example- who you are as a person. Listen first, then come back later with suggestions. A journalist needs to write stories for a newspaper or produce content for a website- they need input.

How can we help you from an XYZ perspective, what themes are important to you? Most journalists these days will write for more than one type of media, i. They are bombarded with press releases that are usually not relevant and do not respect their time. Understanding this is crucial if you are to develop a strong working relationship with them.

Let every interaction solve their problems, save as much time and energy for them as possible, and they will keep coming back. A study from the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships worked out that, on average, you have to spend 50 hours with someone before you consider them a casual friend, 90 hours before you are real friends, and hours to become close friends. The time you invest is not just the first cup of coffee: the moments you create afterwards are key. It's better to start with 5 key journalists than with The relationship has to be maintained.

So it's better to focus on five for your first year. And in the second year 10, or whatever works. Don't do too many. When you meet up with a journalist after starting the relationship, make sure you always bring something useful or insightful with you. This will help you establish a reputation with them as a reliable source of quality information, which will help you in the future. Who in my network would find this relevant?

How do I best prepare the story in advance? And of course you have a lot of contact via phone or via email. At some point, you don't need to have coffees too often, but it's still important that you see each other or have contact once and a while. Building reputation involves building up a solid foundation of quality stories that you can point to as evidence of credibility.

Maybe 5 will pick it up. But they have less reach than that one big newspaper, and they might not be quality publications. They might even consider it as spam, and your pitches will never get to their inbox again.

This can be everything from understanding who they are as a person, to what they have written about historically, to the intricacies of their beat. Knowing all of this and tailoring all your information to them is a key part of being an effective spokesperson. Plus it will make your exchanges more enjoyable. If they share something about their family, of course, I will share something too, because that's how you also build up a relationship.

Some journalists want to keep it purely professional, which is fine too. Make sure that there is a media section on your website, where you have contact details and find the latest media releases and other relevant information. But for key journalists, reach out yourself. While a digital introduction might be a great way to break the ice, nothing can beat meeting IRL.

Events can be a great way to start an in-person relationship with media contacts. We spoke to PR pros who have mastered the art of a media event for their advice on how to do it right:. A media or industry event is the perfect setting to make new connections with journalists or peers. The crowd is in your niche, the event itself is a great talking point, and you can meet people in a natural way.

But the best piece of advice you are going to receive can be found in an interview with Jon Woodroof, owner of creative agency Twotone Amsterdam. His key to networking? Try and find out how you can help the person you are speaking to. If you can do it on the spot, even better. Do things for other people in strategic and actionable ways.

Do you know anyone that's doing something a contact needs? If you do, then pass it on. Networking helps you build the relationships that will make you credible and trustworthy amongst your peers and the media alike. If someone has met you at a conference they are much more likely to open your email. Especially for brands with physical products, events are crucial.

It can be a fantastic way to strengthen the network with these key journalists; which will help you in the future. It always helps when you spend the whole day looking each other in the eyes and having conversations in person. So what does it take to strategically plan, execute, and evaluate an event that your target audience won't easily forget?

We sat down with three PR pros for their biggest learnings on how to get the most exposure out of events and integrate them into your PR strategy. Cut your teeth and do it wrong. Your strategy is pin sharp, your list of contacts is collated, and you are using all the right tools. How do you now translate that into coverage?

An important place to start is understanding context: by knowing editorial newsrooms inside out, your pitches are much likely to get picked up. This knowledge will help you send pitches in the right way, at the right time, to the right people, with the right message.

But PR is not all about pitching: there are lots of other supplementary activities that strengthen your media relations; like strong internal communications, digital public relations, and corporate social responsibility. Part of a great media relations strategy is knowing an editorial newsroom like the back of your hand. We spoke to some journalists to help you paint a picture. Below are the key takeaways from that interview, which you can find in full here.

A while back we organised a roundtable discussion with a few senior communications professionals and a journalist. The journalist shared a few typical issues he ran into, the biggest one being: not being able to get in contact with the press or management team. Whether that was because the PR team were afraid to be bombarded with emails from customers, or they simply forgot, it resulted in a journalist losing interest.

Our tip: add the contact details of one or more members of your press team to your newsroom or press page. Ideally a name, job title, email address and social accounts some journalists prefer social for communication. There is no use in trying to generate news if your organisation is not newsworthy. Inauthentic companies simply do not generate coverage- at least not the good kind. To translate your company values into media coverage, you will need to embody the values you communicate to the outside world.

Journalists and consumers will sense if your storytelling is not an authentic reflection of who you are as a brand. Holistic communication starts with the way your employees- your first ambassadors- feel about and interact with your brand.

Internal PR and thought leadership are great tools to make sure your purpose and values as a company radiate from within. This buy-in from your colleagues can also be seen in how expertly you integrate your communication strategy within your different departments: from sales to marketing to customer service.

Part of your job is to make sure that every stakeholder— including your colleagues— are on the same page. Here are some of the areas in your organisation that deserve love and attention if you want to build credibility with the media. Your first customers are your employees. Strong brands seek understanding and acceptance from every single person involved in an organisation- not just the public. This can start with your internal communication; with newsletters, events, training, but also with your listening.

Internal communications should be a two-way conversation. Journalists are much more likely to cover companies whose employees love working there, as their brand story becomes more credible. Moreover, your internal communications directly affect your external communications, especially in times of crisis. Without communicating well with your staff they can become worried, confused, or make assumptions about the situation.

Being transparent with your staff also transforms them into your key ambassadors. So make sure to keep them in the loop. Company reputation is something that is built over time. Regular check-ins with employees ensure they are aligned with the brand narrative and most importantly! Strong media relationships require influence. Thought leadership helps you build upon your influence by showcasing your expertise, your unique ideas, and your original approach to the work you do.

Humans, by nature, are tribal. To foster understanding from your peers, the public, and the media, you will first need to demonstrate a deep understanding of the business you are in, as well as the needs and values of each of these groups. Building your reputation as a key voice amongst your peers will place you in the heart of industry conversations. To build a thought leadership strategy, identify experts in your company and get their ideas out there. Here are some CEOs using their public personas to help their brands shine:.

With nearly 5 billion people using the internet every day, your online reputation is arguably one of the most important. Building a digital presence can help an organisation become a household name. In this context, managing your SEO is crucial -not only to become more findable than the competition- but also to avoid bad press hanging around. Without intervention from you, one bad story or comment can be immortalised on a Search Engine Results Page SERP or a social media timeline, and become a significant part of your brand history.

You can also consider paid placements to boost your SEO efforts. However, tread lightly with these strategies, if there were some lessons learned during a past crisis then it is better that a person searching for you finds a measured response from a Spokesperson than a bungled attempt to cover it up. They already have quite an intuitive way of figuring out what people really like. Boris Johnson was accused of trying to replace stories about his infamous Brexit campaign bus with stories about his model bus hobby.

There are plenty of other digital strategies to build your online reputation. Make sure your messaging is consistent across all platforms. Work with your marketing department to make sure your social proof- things like product or service reviews- are consistently good.

If they are not, reach out to consumers and find out why. People are much more likely to trust the opinions of someone like them than a faceless brand. A key part of reputation management can also be done using your online newsroom, where you can set the narrative for your media coverage- while boosting your Inbound PR.

You can find out how to build a killer newsroom here. PR and marketing have always had a symbiotic relationship, and as digital activities increasingly take over communication, the areas in which they intersect will only grow. Where PR focuses on areas that require long term investments, like relationship building and reputation management, Marketing will get you quick wins and drive sales.

Not having a consistent brand narrative can make or break a company. It is vital that you work together with marketing and indeed sales to make sure you are all aligned with your brand and product messaging. For this, you will need a strong company purpose and vision, to use as a powerful foundation for all your messaging.

By working together closely with all internal teams, you build brand reputation and sales together, brick by brick. As the PR person, speak up in sales meetings, and really stand up for your purpose. Make sure you all stick to the story. Get the marketeers on side too. Then you will find the long and the short term company objectives will blend into a more integrated story. Business is going through a albeit slow revolution. Making sure that a good portion of your company resources go towards addressing some of the issues society faces is essential.

If a sincere, honest approach isn't part of your brand signature: then what's the use of your product or service? Without demonstrating social responsibility, you run the risk of becoming obsolete. Make sure that your brand is active in this sphere, and show how you are backing up your understanding of your responsibility with concrete action, to keep your reputation intact. Successful PR departments all have one thing in common: they have great online newsrooms.

Pressroom, Mediaroom, Press page, Corporate newsroom, Online media centre…. Luckily, the definition is clear: an online newsroom is the home for media coverage and company news. An online newsroom is not going to bear much fruit if no one can find it, it has no actual information, or it has a clunky user experience. For an online newsroom to be effective it needs some key features. Looking to build, or improve your newsroom? We wrote an article explaining the key components a newsroom should have.

As media transitions from traditional news outlets to the digital sphere, online newsrooms are increasingly important to keep your brand in the conversation. The jury is out on whether press releases are becoming obsolete, but whether you are shooting someone an email or sending them a DM on Linkedin, they will always be directed back to a newsroom. This keeps you professional and consistent and makes space for new modes of reaching out.

PR is also an industry in transition, gradually taking on complementary media activities like brand journalism, thought leadership, and content marketing. An online newsroom ties all this together in one central place and gives you a strong voice, so you can weather these changes. We'd love to show you what we can do, let's schedule a chat! WeTransfer has extended their colourful branding into their newsroom. The whole site is straightforward to navigate, making it easy for journalists to find the story or assets they need in seconds.

The clear about section gives some extra context on brand identity and what products the company owns. Interestingly, with WeTransfer being a design-driven company, they've built a separate section showcasing their awards. The newsroom is set up separately from the rest of WeTransfer's website, entirely dedicated to its media contacts.

Titleist are a good example of what companies with physical products can do with their online newsrooms - by turning them into a fully comprehensive media centre. The advanced search within the media center makes it easy to find what you are looking for in seconds, despite the size. In Dolby's newsroom, you'll find corporate news about all Dolby's products.

In order to keep a clear overview, and give journalists an overview of product-specific news, all articles are segmented into different categories. There is also plenty of information for visiting investors, analysts and other stakeholders, linking to investor resources, executive leadership and corporate facts.

Essentially, the best newsrooms are built in collaboration with your media contacts, not just from input from your marketing team. What is it that journalists want to learn from our newsroom? How can we support them better than we currently do? What happens after journalists receive a press release? Ever asked your media contacts what they think of your newsroom? Or how they like the way you're currently providing them with news? Not sure whether you should build a newsroom, or buy an off-the-shelf solution?

We've created a whitepaper to give you some guidance. Three per cent. To put it simply, the traditional outbound way of doing PR - mass-send a press release to a massive list of media contacts - just got annoying. It interrupts your flow.

Because of this, public relations has become more of a pull than a push. Outbound PR - where you would pitch journalists via the phone or press release - is on the out. We recently interviewed a few journalists to learn where they get their news, and how they'd like to receive updates. Inbound PR on the other hand- helping the media find good content about you - is very much in.

When people find your news you want to give them the best possible answers to their questions. Online newsrooms are the home of those answers- a place where you control the narrative and keep things consistent and professional. You safeguard your brand safety when you drive news to your site, as with any home base. Whatever the channel a journalist may reach out to you on, all roads lead back to your newsroom. Search engines, much like journalists, are becoming less and less susceptible to spam.

Algorithms are much better at finding quality content and care more about your domain authority. There are many things you can do with your newsroom to help those algorithms and the journalists that lead them there find you. Here are his seven actions an organisation should take to become more findable:. Looking for tools to help make your SEO strategy more digestible?

They are there to help you steer the ship during crises. A good Spokesperson is a rare and special breed. They are at once a company and industry expert, a media specialist, and the most likeable person in the room. Having a good Spokesperson on side will do wonders for your media relations. Especially for big companies who are in the spotlight a lot.

Most spokespeople will tell you that their days are never the same, as the news moves fast they suddenly may have to clear their agenda and work on a story. Nevertheless, some of their main activities include:. Preparing interviews and events, aligning messaging with their team and company, writing media releases, planning upcoming stories, solving issues, answering media requests, preparing press events.

Hiring a Spokesperson? Use our Spokesperson scorecard to make sure you find your perfect candidate. On top of the above, a Spokesperson is always available, as they have to react to stories as soon and as proactively as possible. And that's an important thing to note because some people won't want to do that. This might damage its reputation, and protecting and maintaining the good reputation of your company is one of your key priorities.

But, of course, that doesn't mean that I'm working the whole weekend. It just means that I am available. We have a media phone, and we are two spokespeople, so my colleague Joost and I rotate weekends. This way the media can reach us when it's really important. Effective Spokespeople aren't just born: they're also made. Here are some rules of thumb followed by the best and brightest in the industry:. Delivering your message effectively helps you to be understood, which helps journalists out.

When you answer questions, state your key point more on that later and emphasise it with your intonation and gestures. Ask others for feedback too so nothing slips through the net. Anticipate questions and prepare answers If you have a good knowledge of the issues facing your industry and what the journalist interviewing you tends to write about, you can anticipate what kind of questions you will be asked and prepare answers.

This will make you feel more confident. Every journalist is different, some will ask you to give a statement and ask questions at the end, whereas some will try and have a conversation. Preparing answers to challenging questions is a great Spokesperson technique. A journalist is much more likely to warm to someone who seems eager to answer all their questions, than someone blocking them at every turn.

These topics are part of your business. Do follow your key messages This is crucial. Touch upon them all in the interview. Do not add any more ideas as your point will become clouded, no matter how sophisticated your audience is. The media is constantly looking for a new story. PR practitioners are a good, reliable place for the media to go to for newsworthy events.

They often provide newsworthy or public service data, which can save the media the time required to complete their own research and sourcing. The fact that PR specialists have been providing the news mass media with information for years has not really changed the trust level that the media has for the sources. Trust is a critical component between the media and PR practitioners and it must be present for their to be a successful working relationship. It has been said that part of the problem between journalists and PR Practitioners is the perception that PR Specialists have not been good at providing journalists with newsworthy material.

Journalists should express their thoughts and concerns to these PR Specialists to allow for better communication and improvement of the type and quality of news data. As with any relationship, both parties must be committed to working together to achieve success. It is now more important than ever for Public Relations Practitioners to provide honest, truthful, and accurate information to the media.

It is equally important that journalists themselves authenticate information that they have been given. There is much pressure for a Public Relations Practitioner to embellish the truth for their client to make news appear better than it really is. PR Practitioners could help the communication process by providing more detail about specific news. For example, if a client calls the recall of a product, the reason for the recall should be thoroughly explained.

One way a PR Practitioner can avoid ethical issues is to be upfront with their clients and the media regarding any potential ethical issues. The pressure for a PR Practitioner can be great because of the need to work with multiple entities in order to produce their information. Having a basis for their personal and professional ethics will go a long way in helping a PR Practitioner. This basis should include considering the interests of themselves, the media, and the entity they are representing.

Respect for those involved and social responsibility should also be an inherent part of ethics. Another approach to ethics is based on virtue. This includes learning from others, being prepared to take risks, and practicing complete honesty in their reporting.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved 2 April Media Relations: Issues and Strategies. Media Relations. Practical Media Relations Aldershot: Gower, Practical Media Relations. Aldershot: Gower, Retrieved The Houston Chronicle.

School of Journalism and Communication. Authority control: National libraries Germany. Categories : Public relations Journalism.

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